2012 Women's Olympiad Player Bios

Anna Zatonskih

Title: 
International Master
Rating: 
2506
Residence: 
Germany
Age: 
34
Status: 
Accepted
Chess Highlights: 
Four-Time U.S. Women's Champion (2011, 2009, 2008, 2006); Gold Individual Medal in 2008 Chess Olympiad
Bio: 

Anna Zatonskih is a four-time U.S. Women's Champion. Three years ago, Zatonskih won the U.S. Women's Championship with a dominating score of 8.5/9, but she ran into stiff competition in 2010 against her longtime nemesis IM Irina Krush. Zatonskih recaptured the title in 2011 with a gutsy and grueling performance. Including the tiebreak and playoff matches, she played 19 games of chess over a two-week period to win the 2011 U.S. Women's title. Last year, Zatonskih suffered a heartbreaking loss in a playoff match agaisnt Krush, who went on to win the event.  

Either Krush or Zatonskih have been the clear favorite each of the past five years, and odds-on money is that it will come down to one of the two to win the title of 2013 U.S. Women's Championship.

Anna said her chess highlights include the 2004 silver medal and the 2008 bronze she helped the U.S. team win at the Chess Olympics.

Outside of the chess, Anna has a variety of interests from bicycling to ping pong to scuba diving. She even played an underwater match while in scuba gear on a giant board. The game couldn't go longer than 50 minutes, but she played to a draw. Coached by her husband, German Grandmaster Daniel Fridman, Anna comes into the tournament in the hopes of securing her fourth title.

Irina Krush

Title: 
International Master
Rating: 
2489
Residence: 
Brooklyn, New York
Age: 
29
Status: 
Accepted
Chess Highlights: 
Four-time U.S. Women's Champion: 2012, 2010, 2007, 1998 (youngest winner ever at age 14); Member of 2004 Silver Medal U.S. Olympiad Team and 2008 Bronze Medal Team
Bio: 

Irina Krush secured her fourth U.S. Women's title last year after narrowly missing out on a title in 2011. Although she is the reigning U.S. Women's Champion, she is coming into the tourney second by rating, and both she and IM Anna Zatonskih are the clear front runners to win this year's event.

Irina says looks forward to chess matches, but doesn't spend much time contemplating her chess success or failures. "I'm more attached to my future accomplishments." She said she enjoys the challenge of playing grandmasters most. "When you beat a strong GM, that's when you feel like you can play chess." Krush was the only female player to compete in the 2010 U.S. Championship, and turned in an impressive 12th-place finish, narrowly missing another GM norm.

Her performance at the 2010 U.S. Women's Championship just a few months later delivered her third title and further cemented her as one the top players in the nation.

Irina has a degree in international relations from NYU, but she is currently concentrating on chess. The 2008 Samford Chess Fellowship recipient has been hunting for GM norms and recently participated in the GM Norm Invitational in Saint Louis where she finished T-4th behind the three GMs in the field.

Outside of chess, Irina enjoys tennis, reading, writing, yoga and music.

Krush will be battling hard this year to surpass Zatonskih with her fifth U.S. Women's Championship title. She is coming off of a spectacular performace at the 2013 Women's World Team Championship, where she earned a gold medal for her superior performance on board 2 for the U.S. team, a result Krush called the best of her career.

Tatev Abrahamyan

Title: 
Women's Grandmaster
Rating: 
2409
Residence: 
Glendale, California
Age: 
25
Status: 
Accepted
Chess Highlights: 
2011 and 2004 U.S. Women's Championship Runner-Up; 2008 and 2005 U.S. Women's Chess Championship Third Place; 2006 Pan-Am U18 (Perfect Score)
Bio: 

Tatev Abrahamyan started playing chess at 8 after her father took her to the Chess Olympiad games in 1996. There she met Grandmaster Judit Polgar, arguably the greatest woman player of all time and the only woman in the tournament. "I was in complete awe," Tatev said. "My first thought was, 'I want to be just like her.'" She was soon playing competitively among the top players her age in Europe and has played in the U.S. Women's Chess Championship eight times.

But becoming a top chess player has not been easy. "The main problem is balancing school with chess. Even though college is the number one priority for me, I usually take time off to play in major events, like this one." When she is not studying or playing chess, she likes to read, play tennis, travel, watch movies and hang out with friends.

Another big challege for Tatev was moving to the U.S. In fact, she said: "It was the biggest change in my life, and it happened in a very short period of time. Everything in my life changed in a matter of few months. I had to give up everything I knew and start a new life. Even though I have lived here for some time now, it was a very big adjustment, and I think a continuous one."

Tatev is a formidable competitor. At the 2010 U.S. Women's Championship she played her heart out to a fantastic 7/9 score, which would usually be enough to net first place, but actually put her in a tie for second place, half a point behind Irina Krush. Tatev's strong play and fighting qualities in 2010 earned her the 9 Queens/goddess chess fighting spirit award, which was selected by former Women's World Champion, Alexandra Kosteniuk.

At the 2011 U.S. Women's Championship, Tatev turned in a remarkable performance, falling just short to Anna Zatonskih in the playoff finals to finish in second place. Although she had a somewhat disappointing performance last year (6th place overall), Tatev has gained more than 70 USCF rating points since the event in 2012, and she is poised to mae a deep run at this year's Championship.

Sabina Foisor

Title: 
Women's Grandmaster
Rating: 
2397
Residence: 
Baltimore, Maryland
Age: 
23
Status: 
Accepted
Chess Highlights: 
Multiple Romania girls youth champion; 2004 Multiple Romanian and European champion in blitz and rapid; finished in top 20 at European Chess Championship in 2007, qualifying her for the World Chess Championship
Bio: 

Sabina Foisor has been a chess dynamo since starting around age 4. While her parents have been her biggest chess influence, she says her favorite players are Gary Kasparov and the late Bobby Fischer. Like many players, she has traveled the globe playing in tournaments, and she has participated in each of the past four U.S. Women's Championships (2012, 2011, 2010 and 2009). 2013 will mark her fifth appearance. Her main goal in chess is to become one of the top 20 women players in the world.

When not playing or training for chess, she likes to travel, read books, watch movies and hang out with friends. "Of course I can manage to balance chess with other things," she says. She has many heroes outside of chess, including her family, Albert Einstein, Isaac Newton and Sigmund Freud. After listing those three she added, "I will stop here because the list would be too large."

One of her biggest challenges was moving to the U.S. to study at University of Maryland at Baltimore County, which has a strong chess program. Indeed, UMBC won the 2009 U.S. national collegiate title. At UMBC Foisor studies psychology, modern language and linguistics.

Rusudan Goletiani

Title: 
International Master
Rating: 
2337
Residence: 
Hartsdale, New York
Age: 
31
Status: 
Accepted
Chess Highlights: 
2005 U.S. Women's Champion, Soviet Union champion under age of 12; Georgian and Russian champion under 14; World Junior Champion under 14, 16, 18
Bio: 

For about as long as Rusudan Goletiani has been playing chess, she has been among the elite players, and that includes the ten years she has spent in the United States. The winner of the 2005 U.S. Women's Championship says she can't pick out one or two highlights that stand out. "Every accomplishment means a lot," she says, adding that her ultimate chess goal is to become a grandmaster.

Rusudan considers the late, great Russian grandmaster Alexander Alekhine as her biggest chess influence and adds that outside of chess she admires “every person that works hard to achieve his or her goal."

Outside of chess, Rusudan enjoys ping pong, reading and cooking. She is married with two children, but Rusudan says she doesn't have much difficult fitting the rigors of chess into her daily life. "I wish I had more time for everything, but somehow I manage it all," she says. Indeed, her most difficult challenge was moving – from her native country of Georgia to the New York when she was 19. "I did not have a family in New York, and did not know much English," she says.

Two years ago, she took a break from the 2010 U.S. Women's Championship to have her second child, but she came back to the event in 2011. She is hoping the 2012 event will bring her her second title.