GM Sam Shankland

Title: 
Grandmaster
Rating: 
2717
Residence: 
Orinda, CA
Age: 
24
Status: 
Accepted
Chess Highlights: 
Sam placed third at the 2011 U.S. Championship. He is also the 2010 U.S. Junior Closed Champion; 2009 Champion of State Champions; 2008 World Under 18 co-champion; and the 2008 Calchess State Champion. Shankland recently won the 2016 Fargenes International, the 2016 Edmonton International, and also took first place at Biel Masters 2016. Additionally, he played on the U.S. team which took first place at the 42nd Chess Olympiad in Baku, Azerbaijan. GM Shankland is currently rated 2667 FIDE(2648 URS), making him the seventh highest rated player in the U.S. and #85 worldwide.
Bio: 

When Sam Shankland was just 18, he announced he would be retiring from the game of chess. In order to honor his previous commitments, however, he agreed to play in one more event, the 2010 U.S. Junior Closed Championship, which he managed to win after facing back-to-back playoff matches against Parker Zhao and tourney favorite GM Ray Robson. That achievement offered him an automatic invitation to play in the 2011 U.S. Championship, which ultimately proved to be a difficult offer to refuse.

Sam performed admirably at the 2011 U.S. Championship, edging out veteran GM Alexander Onischuk in a playoff to reach the four-player quad finals. There he ran into eventual champion GM Gata Kamsky, who topped him 1.5-.5. After his defeat, Shankland remained upbeat.  “Just because I’m not in the running for first place doesn’t mean the tournament is over,” he said. “Plus third place sounds cooler than fourth. You can call it a bronze medal.” Shankland's positive attitude proved prescient as he topped GM Robert Hess in a playoff for third place. The Brandeis University student has called the U.S. Championship "his dream tournament for the year."

Shankland scored some notable victories in 2016.  He took first place at Fargenes international, won the Edmonton International, and also took first place at Biel Masters, as well playing for the gold medal winning U.S. team at the 42nd Chess Olympiad.  Because of his usually strong, but sometimes unpredictable, play, he will be an intriguing player to watch at this year's championship.